Travis Bourda ~ Life to 20 years for Marijuana

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TRAVIS BOURDA # 387150
LA STATE PRISON
17544 TUNICA TRACE
ANGOLA, LA 70712

TRAVIS BOURDA
REGISTER NUMBER: 387150
DOB: 01/06/1980
AGE: 36
RACE: AFRICAN AMERICAN
SEX: MALE
LOCATED AT: LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
RELEASE DATE: 20 YEARS


Words from Travis Bourda ~ Click here

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Sentenced reduced from Life to 20 years.

Travis Bourda is serving LWOP for possession of 130 grams (less than 5 ounces) of weeds with intent to distribute.  

Travis Bourda is serving LWOP for possession of 130 grams of marijuana with intent to distribute. Although no marijuana was found in his possession, the 29-year-old oil rigger was convicted at trial in October 2009. Bourda says he was represented by court-appointed counsel who filed no motions, failed to investigate, and made no objections at trial. The trial judge initially sentenced Bourda to eight years as a habitual offender because of his prior convictions for carnal knowledge of a juvenile a decade earlier when he was 19, and distribution of marijuana. After the prosecutor charged him as a third-strike habitual offender, the judge resentenced Bourda to 14 years and stated on the record that the life sentence sought by the prosecutor would be unconstitutionally excessive:I believe a life sentence under the circumstances in these cases, a drug case, a carnal knowledge case, and another drug case would be an unconstitutional sentence. I believe that fourteen years is more than enough considering the underlying charge was possession with intent to distribute marijuana, and that the amount of marijuana involved was not significant. The prosecutor appealed the 14-year-sentence as illegally lenient, and the appellate court agreed and sentenced Bourda to life without parole. Bourda, who calls himself “the most miserable person there is,” is a diagnosed schizophrenic who says he has received intermittent mental health care since he was 12. He talks with his mother and sister twice a week and has taken educational, religious, substance abuse, welding, and anger management classes in prison. Of his sentence, Bourda says, “Life without parole means you never going home, you never have a chance to show society you have truly change[d] and can be a productive member of society.” He adds, “It is a sense of hopelessness. Every day you wonder if you are ever going to make it home to your family and children.”

The judge said, “I believe a life sentence under the circumstances would be an unconstitutional sentence considering the charge was possession with intent to distribute marijuana, and that the amount of marijuana involved was not significant.”

Travis Bourda is serving LWOP for possession of 130 grams of marijuana with intent to distribute. Although no marijuana was found in his possession, the 29-year-old oil rigger was convicted at trial in October 2009. Bourda says he was represented by court-appointed counsel who filed no motions, failed to investigate, and made no objections at trial. The trial judge initially sentenced Bourda to eight years as a habitual offender because of his prior convictions for carnal knowledge of a juvenile a decade earlier when he was 19, and distribution of marijuana. After the prosecutor charged him as a third-strike habitual offender, the judge resentenced Bourda to 14 years and stated on the record that the life sentence sought by the prosecutor would be unconstitutionally excessive:I believe a life sentence under the circumstances in these cases, a drug case, a carnal knowledge case, and another drug case would be an unconstitutional sentence…. I believe that fourteen years is more than enough considering the underlying charge was possession with intent to distribute marijuana, and that the amount of marijuana involved was not significant. The prosecutor appealed the 14-year-sentence as illegally lenient, and the appellate court agreed and sentenced Bourda to life without parole. Bourda, who calls himself “the most miserable person there is,” is a diagnosed schizophrenic who says he has received intermittent mental health care since he was 12. He talks with his mother and sister twice a week and has taken educational, religious, substance abuse, welding, and anger management classes in prison. Of his sentence, Bourda says, “Life without parole means you never going home, you never have a chance to show society you have truly changed and can be a productive member of society.”1163 He adds, “It is a sense of hopelessness. Every day you wonder if you are ever going to make it home to your family and children.”

Travis last saw his twin's when they were three months old. Angel Taylor Bourda Aaliyah Taylor Bourda need their Dad home.


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  • commented 2015-11-01 08:41:33 -0800
    Updated 10/2017